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Results for: 'Public Health Projects'

44:49

Kate Miller presents Forest health monitoring in eastern national parks: lessons learned and future concerns (2020 FEMC Conference)

By: vmc

Kate Miller, Quantitative Ecologist, National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program (NPS I&M), presents the day 1 plenary at the 2020 FEMC Conference. Additional conference content can be accessed at https://www.uvm.edu/femc/cooperative/co...

5:50

University of Vermont Biology Thanksgiving: Gratitude in Science

By: tsoleary

Thanksgiving is traditionally a time to take a step back from the day-to-day grind and take a mental inventory of the things for which we are grateful: our family, friends, colleagues, homes, & health. This is especially important in a brutal year...

50:35

Creating an Open Access Impact Within and Beyond the University

By: schwrks

A growing movement is using tools such as open access journals and repositories to transform scholarly communications on a global scale. Open access refers to literature and published research results that are made available online without access ...

13:50

Continence Visual Supports

By: jnauheim

This video reviews easy to make visual supports families can use during toileting and instructions on how to make them. The Continence Project believes the mastery of toileting skills promotes inclusion at home, school, and in the community. We be...

1:47

Late Season Defoliators

By: uvmext

As late summer progresses so-called late-season defoliators are beginning to become visible in Vermont woods. Two such insects are maple leaf cutter and maple trumpet skeletonizer. The first report of damage from maple leaf cutter was in 1911 when...

1:49

2020 Crop Update #3

By: uvmext

The USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service or NASS has released the crop totals for the 2020 maple season. People familiar with maple sugaring might remember that it takes approximately 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. This ra...

2:08

Tapping

By: uvmext

Winter is almost over and spring is almost here; it's time to make maple syrup. Each season sugar makers have to drill a new hole if they want to collect sap. The reason for this has to do with how trees respond to wounds. When a hole is drilled i...